How to Get Strong – The Science of Strength

Intro to Muscular Strength

How strong you are (and how strong you could be) depends on the performance of your body’sskeletal muscles.

Your body’s muscles are highly adaptable. They will react to the stresses that you place upon them.

  • Sit on the couch and they will atrophy.
  • Try and run fast and they adapt to produce faster contractions.
  • Lift heavy objects and they will increase their ability to produce maximum strength.

Muscular Strength can and has been categorized in a variety of different ways. In this article, I am choosing to divide Muscular Strength into four categories, based primarily on Newton’s Second Law.

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Basics of Building Muscle

Be patient. Building muscle is not a quick fix; it takes time before you start seeing muscle development. This can be discouraging and make you want to quit. However, if you are training with the proper technique and doing what you need to do, trust that the results will come on time.

Many trainers will advise you to change your workout routine every few months. You should however keep in mind that this is not necessary. If the routine that you are using is providing excellent results, then you should stick with it! Change your routine only if it is not giving you the results that you seek, or if you feel that you have gained most of the benefits from it.

Written by Total Health Links

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STRENGTH TRAINING For Wellness

While virtually everyone is aware of the benefits of aerobic exercise, there still seems to be a lot of confusion about the subject of weight training and its place in an overall wellness program. Maybe it’s some residual confusion left over from the “Pumping Iron” days when weight training was something done only by bodybuilders and the Muscle Beach crowd. Who knows. Whatever the reason, it’s time to put some of the myths about weight training to rest.

We now know that weight training, far from being just a vanity pursuit, is a critical part of health and wellness and that it can benefit anyone, regardless of sex or age. Weight training may be one of the most effective strategies you can take to prevent osteoporosis, and that’s equally true if you’re a man or a woman. Weight training increases bone mineral density, it improves glucose metabolism, it’s one of the most effective things you can do to increase HDL (the “good” cholesterol), it raises your metabolism (making it easier to lose fat) and it improves your ability to function in the world independently as you get older. All that, and it makes you look good in the bargain!

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Progression Of Weight: Building Muscle And Strength One Rep At A Time

Progression is the key to muscle and strength building. I often tell lifters to use the following approach during each workout:

Push yourself on every set. Try to perform as many reps as possible without training to failure. When you can perform the recommended maximum number of reps for a set, add weight the next time in the gym.

Let me explain exactly what this means by providing an example. After this example, I want to show you just how powerful the addition of a single rep can be.

Written by Steve Shaw

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Intensity Is Everything: Part 1 – Building New Muscle With Intensity Techniques

All my life I have always wanted a cool nickname. In high school I even went so far as to try to give myself the nickname C-Dub. This was definitely not a proud moment for me. But recently, after speaking with a friend at my gym I was informed that the majority of the people at my gym already had a nickname for me.

Initially I was excited, but that changed when I found out what my nickname was. My great new nickname is now “That Crazy Guy”. As in, “Be careful not step in front of That Crazy Guy while he’s doing walking lunges.” Apparently, some people at my gym feel that I am crazy because of the level of intensity that I train with. This is not exactly the awesome nickname I had in mind, but I’ll take it.

Written by Cliff Wilson

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The Gym Is War: Prepare Your Mental Game

Cogito Ergo Sum: I think therefore I am. These words of wisdom were originally dropped by the philosopher René Descartes at the turn of the 17th century. And through the ages, they have stood the test of time as a to-the-point representation of the power of the human mind. Though Descartes didn’t share our united appreciation for the iron, his fundamental philosophy has unknowingly influenced the performance of successful bodybuilders and powerlifters for decades.

Written by Adam Szetela

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