A Popular Myth About Running Injuries

Almost everyone who runs (or has shopped for running shoes) has heard that how your foot pronates, or rolls inward, as you land affects your injury risk. Pronate too much or too little, conventional wisdom tells us, and you’ll wind up hurt. But a provocative new study shows that this deeply entrenched belief is probably wrong and that there is still a great deal we don’t understand about pronation and why the foot rolls as it does.

For the new study, published online this month in The British Journal of Sports Medicine, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark and other institutions began by advertising in Danish newspapers and at gyms to find men and women who didn’t run but were game to try.

Written by Gretchen Reynolds

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How Carbs Can Trigger Food Cravings

Are all calories created equal? A new study suggests that in at least one important way, they may not be.

Sugary foods and drinks, white bread and other processed carbohydrates that are known to cause abrupt spikes and falls in blood sugar appear to stimulate parts of the brain involved in hunger, craving and reward, the new research shows. The findings, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, suggest that these so-called high-glycemic foods influence the brain in a way that might drive some people to overeat.

Written by Anahad O’Connor

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Exercise really does improve brain power

(NaturalNews) Aerobic exercise doesn’t just build muscle, it also builds mass in key brain areas and improves cognitive performance, says Art Kramer of the University of Illinois. Kramer presented the results of his research into the relationship between physical fitness and cognition at the 2013 meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston.

“Populations throughout the industrialized world are becoming increasing sedentary as a result of the changing nature of work and leisure activities,” Kramer said. “As a result of these societal changes, increases in diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis and some cancers are increasing. Physical activity serves to reduce susceptibility to these diseases.”

Written by David Gutierrez

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Three unique exercises to give you powerful arms

(NaturalNews) Bored of the same old bicep curls and dips? Sick of shoulder presses? You can sculpt your arms and shoulders with unique exercises. Exercise variety is beneficial, not just so that you don’t get bored in your workouts, but also because it keeps your muscles from adapting to a routine. Mix it up with lesser known arm exercises and shoulder exercises, and you’ll see killer arms in no time. These exercises are not only unique, they are also easy to do at home with minimal equipment for added convenience.

Written by Sarka-Jonae Miller

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Improve osteoporosis, arthritis, and other orthopedic disorders with exercise

(NaturalNews) Older people and those with conditions affecting their bones often believe that exercise is unsafe. However, exercise is known to reduce symptoms and even reverse some musculoskeletal issues. Older adults and people with frail bones caused by osteoporosis or aging-related loss of bone density can follow general exercise guidelines as laid out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine with some modifications.

Written by Sarka-Jonae Miller

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Calf exercises: Sit down to build yourself up

(NaturalNews) Building killer calves is more complicated than people think. Most exercisers do a bunch of standing calf exercises like standing calf raises, sled hack calf raises, donkey raises, and calf presses to bulk up not realizing that their entire workout is only targeting half of the muscles in the calves. Standing calf exercises work the gastrocnemius, a muscle in the lower leg close to the surface of the skin. Underneath the gastrocnemius is the soleus. The soleus is wider than the gastrocnemius and helps to add width to the lower leg. This muscle gets next to no work when you do standing calf exercises. The solution is to add seated calf exercises to your routine.

Written by Sarka-Jonae Miller

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Even 5-10 minutes of daily physical activity can improve health

We know from a vast library of research that physical exercise prevents heart disease, lowers high blood pressure, reduces LDL cholesterol, improves digestion, speeds food transit through your large intestine, oxygenates internal organs, improves joint flexibility, enhances mental function, prevents cancer, prevents diabetes, enhances bone density, prevents osteoporosis, reverses depression and has many other beneficial effects. In fact, physical exercise is absolutely essential for being healthy, and without it, you’ll never be truly happy, even if you follow other health strategies mentioned on this site.

Written by Mike Adams

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